Top Ten Tuesday: Ten Authors I Own The Most Books From

From The Broke and the Bookish, a new Top Ten Tuesday topic. Looks like series authors have a serious advantage, for this list. Also long-standing authors. I’m only counting full-length novels.

Borrowed from kelleyarmstrong.com

1. Kelley Armstrong
Books Owned: 19
Genre: Urban fantasy, YA urban fantasy, thriller
Most Famous Work: Women of the Otherworld series, starting with Bitten. Follows a werewolf estranged from her pack, who became a wolf by getting bitten by her ex (the act that made him her ex). Her old pack runs into trouble that they need her help for. The series follows several leads throughout its thirteen book run. Kelley Armstrong likes to change things up, and I absolutely love that. Bitten has also been recently adapted to a Syfy series.

Borrowed from patriciabriggs.com

2. Patricia Briggs
Books Owned: 17
Genre: Urban fantasy, fantasy
Most Famous Work: The Mercy Thompson series, beginning with Moon Called. An urban fantasy series following a walker, or were-coyote, who’d been raised by a werewolf pack. The werewolf pack, for North America. Between a fae boss, vampire friends, and a kindling flirtation with the local Alpha, Mercy gets dragged into her fair share of trouble. Fortunately, she’s quite a resourceful person and has a way of figuring out how to help her friends. Patricia Briggs has a way with characters, and she’s written more than her fair share of compelling ones.

Borrowed from seananmcguire.com

3. Seanan McGuire/Mira Grant 
Books Owned: 14
Genre: Urban fantasy, sci-fi, horror
Most Famous Work: Probably the Newsflesh trilogy as Mira Grant, following a journalist in a post-zombie apocalyptic world. Said journalist is invited to follow the campaign of a presidential candidate, only to find that zombies aren’t the only monsters in the world. Or the Toby Daye series, following a half-fae detective who’d been turned into a fish for fourteen years as the result of a personal job gone wrong. She lost her family as a result, and it takes a murder to get her to feel like she can reconnect with her fae friends. All of Seanan McGuire’s series are unique and engaging, and she’s one of my favorite authors.

Borrowed from annebishop.com

4. Anne Bishop
Books Owned: 12
Genre: Dark fantasy
Most Famous Work: The Black Jewels Trilogy. The Blood are a race of people who are with power determined by the jewel they receive in a ceremony, and an inborn caste. But their society is broken, and so a child is born from dreams (metaphorically) with an abundance of dark power and the task of putting the world back to rights. But before she grows into her power, she is just a child, as vulnerable as any other to the dangers of this world. It’s been a long time since I read this series–actually, it was one of my first fantasies, one of my introductions to the genre. But be warned, Anne Bishop’s stuff is dark.

Borrowed from tamorapierce.com

5. Tamora Pierce
Books Owned: 11
Genre: YA fantasy
Most Famous Work: The Song of the Lioness quartet. In a medieval-esque world where only boys can train to be pages, squires, and knights, Alanna concocts a scheme with her twin brother to get herself sent off to learn to be a knight and him off to study magic. The quartet follows Alanna from her childhood into adulthood–from the trials of being a growing girl pretending to be a boy, to the trials of a knight out in the world, making a name for herself. I often repeat that I wish I’d been reading these books in my childhood, but they’re plenty engrossing even now.

Borrowed from kate.ilona-andrews.com

6. Ilona Andrews
Books Owned: 11
Genre: Urban fantasy, and a lot of genre-bending stuff (they like to blur the lines between UR, PNR, dark fantasy, sci-fi, and romance)
Most Famous Work: The Kate Daniels series. Kate is mercenary lying low and hiding her heritage lest it get her killed. The murder of her guardian forces her to action, however, and that just might put in motion events that will lead to her to face her greatest foe. This series is pure urban fantasy, though a lot of their work is hard to classify. Ilona and Gordon Andrews do fantastic worldbuilding, create self-sufficient yet not isolated heroines, and lean dark.

Borrowed from jacquelinecarey.com

7. Jacqueline Carey
Books Owned: 10
Genre: Epic fantasy, post-apocalyptic, urban fantasy
Most Famous Work: An epic fantasy trilogy beginning with Kushiel’s Dart, following a courtesan-spy on her world-changing intrigues. The series borders on being an alternate history, with its rich and deep world. I don’t think I’ve ever read another series as deeply epic as this one, touching various corners of the world and meeting all kinds of people. The protagonist, Phedre, is unique in that she can feel sympathy for near anyone. She’s very empathic, and it’s refreshing to get to follow a character, and an author, determined to look at every character like a person.

Borrowed from melanierawn.com

8. Melanie Rawn
Books Owned: 9
Genre: Epic/political fantasy
Most Famous Work: The Dragon Prince series. Prince Rohan, his betrothed, Sioned, and their allies are in a dicey political situation. They need to maneuver around the amoral High Prince and his plans for Rohan, Sioned, and his realm. So Rohan pretends to be dumber than he is and Sioned pretends to be uninterested, as they elude the High Prince’s schemes and fight to build a better future. It’s been a long time since I’ve read the series, but I remember it being rich and complex. It completely swept me away, way back when.

Borrowed from karenchance.com

9. Karen Chance
Books Owned: 9
Genre: Urban fantasy
Most Famous Work: The Cassandra Palmer series. Cassie is a clairvoyant raised by the vampires. But she’s coming into a different sort of power. The vampires and the mages think of her as a pawn, but Cassie isn’t exactly easy to control, and she’s going to turn herself into a player. Since Cassie can travel time, there are a bunch of instances when things happen in different orders for different characters, even across different books–personally, I thought this was a lot of fun. Karen Chance is also very good with action. She writes a lot of it, and she writes it with a lot of variety. And she loves throwing chaos into the mix.

Borrowed from robinhobb.com

10. Robin Hobb
Books Owned: 6
Genre: Fantasy
Most Famous Work: The Farseer Trilogy, beginning with Assassin’s Apprentice. This is embarrassing, but I haven’t actually read this trilogy yet. It’s on my TBR list, I promise! But yes, I have not yet read the most famous work of an author from whom I own six books. I hang my head in shame. The book is about an assassin and his exploits in a fantasy world, and that’s all I know so far.

Anyone else? Which author do you own the most books by? And how many books do you own by a single author?

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Media and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.